Musing on Family Day

So Family Day, 2018. A relatively new holiday in our Canadian calendar, one likely created to break up the long winters, but one also designed, one would like to think, to bring us closer to the people who matter in our lives. Here at the Old Stone House we’re pursing various activities. My dearest husband has spent the morning sanding drywall mud in the main bathroom, part of the 17 year (so far) renovation project…

Book launch for Caliban

So it would appear I’m having a book launch for my new novel, Caliban.  The great people at Monigram Coffee Roasters are hosting the reading and signing, and some delicious delectables will be available for guests. Would love to meet some of my fans, old and new. I’ll be doing a short reading. I’ll also have books for sale which I’m happy to sign for you. Suppose it might be a good idea to let you…

Isle of Skye

While working on the revision of The Rose Guardian, I’ve been mucking around with a new painting. I think I will call this one finished. (One never knows about these things. I’ve looked at paintings years later and thought: Oh, I could have done that differently. But yes, for now it’s done. The painting is watercolour on an eighth sheet of d’Arches 300lb cold pressed paper, depicting a stormy dawn on the Isle of Skye. I’ve always been drawn…

Review: The Longest Year

The Longest Year by Daniel Grenier My rating: 2 of 5 stars It is not to be said I give up on a book. Yet there were many times I was sorely tempted to do just that with this finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for French Fiction, by Daniel Grenier. Perhaps that lack is due to the translation. The story Grenier tells is a Methuselah tale, and one which doesn’t bring much new…

Tesseracts 22 Alchemy and Artifacts

Because it’s important to examine new possibilities, explore new experiences, I’ve agreed to co-edit the next Tesseracts anthology from Edge Publishing, with fellow author and colleague, Susan MacGregor. I’m looking forward to this journey, especially in light of the fact the anthology examines the magic behind history, what it is has sparked the imagination of countless generations to either quest for the reality of a legend (Vasco da Gama and the Fountain of Youth), or formed the…

Excerpt from Caliban

To tempt you a bit, I’m giving you a preview of my new novella, Caliban.  There can be an inherent bias in anthropological study. Perspective is everything. Report from the Commissioner on Dreamweavers. The problem with what Jabod McCullough asked was it didn’t make any sense. Why choose a permanent assignment Active on a quarantined planet? Tine asked that question. “Because I think you’re incorruptible,” Jabod answered, his holo standing in one of the rocks Tine…

Short story sale

After a bit of a dry spell, I’m tickled silly to announce I’ve sold a short story to R. Graeme Cameron’s excellent online magazine of SF&F, Polar Borealis. A Bear at the Fridge, the story in question, is a short, strange tale which will hopefully entertain and delight. No deep, angst-filled passages in this story. Just, well, weird. Graeme tells me A Bear at the Fridge will appear in Issue 6. So, visit Polar Borealis, and have a good read….

Review: The Stone Sky, by N.K. Jemisin

The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin My rating: 4 of 5 stars The conclusion of N.K. Jemisin’s stunning and original trilogy, The Broken Earth perfectly completes in The Stone Sky. I have said it before, and I will say it again, Jemisin has written a remarkable, unique and fascinating world, people by fascinating characters and species, wrapped in flawless and beautiful writing. There is no lag in tension, no meandering exposition. This is storytelling at…